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The Ultimate Guide to Asset Management

If you had read my earlier post “A New Hope: Top 6 Things I Learnt At NRC 2015 Mumbai“, then you would have also read my learning from Naushad Shikalgar of J.N.Engineering – ‘Proactive Machinery Maintenance is not an expense and is an investment that has long-term benefits’.

Maintenance is important in any organization. Without proper maintenance, assets deteriorate over time reducing the quality of your output produced. It can also impact the safety of your asset or your people who operate it.

Traditionally, maintenance has been viewed as a cost center in an organization because it costs you money to hire maintenance technicians and purchase the spare parts to keep your systems running smoothly. Too often, senior executives ignore the value-add that maintenance can bring to your organization. These include:

  • A reduction in reactive maintenance costs
  • Reducing costs to restart production after a breakdown
  • Limiting production scrap
  • Costs of downtime such as missed orders and lost revenue
  • Customer perception/satisfaction
  • Improved quality of products
  • Reduced environmental impact

 

By definition, Asset management is a systematic process of deploying, operating, maintaining, upgrading, and disposing of assets cost-effectively.

During his talk, Naushad spoke extensively on Asset Management Strategy-Plan-Execution including the various approaches to maintenance that I found interesting and hope you too would like it when you read. Hence, I have reproduced the 34 slides (click on the picture below) here that effectively forms a comprehensive guide on asset management.

Asset Management

Click on Image

Summarizing, asset management focuses on assuring your people, parts and processes are optimized to improve asset performance. Reducing inventory, maintenance costs and the number of downtime events raises your productivity, while simultaneously driving financial performance and predictability. It also helps your employees with the right tools to make good decisions about driving your plant performance.

Do you agree? How do you look at Asset Management?


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Adopt Higher Levels of Mechanization To Improve Quality And Reduce Cost – T.K.Mukherjee

The Indian entrepreneurs must accept that only by adopting a higher degree of mechanization they would be able to improve the quality and reduce cost, says T.K.Mukherjee, CEO Mentor & Strategist and Past President of AIRIA in an exclusive interview with Rubber Machinery World. He further adds that Indian Rubber industry could grow at 7 per cent CAGR during the next 5 years to touch USD 19 billion with maximum demand from automotive sector.

Mukherjee, a post-graduate in science and an MDP alumnus of IIM Calcutta, served for over 18 years as the CEO/MD of Phoenix Yule (erstwhile Andrew Yule and now Phoenix Conveyor Belts India Pvt Ltd). A motivational leader who strongly believes in hard work, smart networking and team development, Mukherjee taught me two things 1) there is no end to enrich one’s job knowledge 2) Always recognize that ‘Customer is the Master’.

Currently a mentor to CEOs and strategist, he has been rooted to his belief that Knowledge is Power and Power is Leadership.

His interview here in this edition of “Know A Rubber Leader” series brings in a leadership perspective of a experienced manager who has, worked with rubber machinery early in his career and, used his knowledge to transform a sick PSU (Public Sector Unit) into a dynamic and vibrant MNC.

Know A Rubber Leader

Here’s is Mukherjee’s complete interview reproduced for you.

  1. Hello Mr. Mukherjee. First of all thank you for accepting an interview with Rubber Machinery World and sharing your thoughts. For over 4 years, that we have been interacting, I have seen you transitioning within different leadership and mentoring roles with inspiration and ease. I have been in awe of your energy level and dynamism. So let me start with a personal question – what drives you?

 The various driving forces which act on me are generally situational. However, the biggest forces are:

  • I still believe that my best is yet to come
  • I always feel that as an Indian why can’t we be the best
  • There must be a continuous transaction with the society under which I operate

However, strong driving forces do not always bring success. I grew up predominantly during pre-91 era. We had limited resources and hence ability to take up challenges was less. With the opening up of the economy, various opportunities started knocking at our doors and thus we progressed faster. Failures still remained as a great teacher in my life. One point is very relevant – the definition of success changes from generation to generation. We must appreciate that.

  1. Tell me about a leadership position that you enjoyed the most? Why?

I had the good luck to work as a CEO/MD for over 18 long years. During this period the most enjoyable and rewarding experience was to transform a sick PSU to a vibrant and profitable MNC. This process provided me a great learning – how to change the mind-set of the people. One very challenging issue was to convince the leftist trade unionists about the fruits of privatization! There were cultural issues, communication issues – all providing challenges.

  1. Indian rubber industry has a turnover of around USD 14 Bn with exports touching USD 2.67 Bn. Where do you see this in next 5 years and which sub-sector will have the most significant growth?

I believe that Indian Rubber industry could grow @7% CAGR during the next 5 years, thereby USD 14 Bn may touch 19 Bn. Similarly as far as Indian exports of rubber products are concerned it may touch 4 Bn, thanks to some recent govt. initiatives. The demand growth could be maximum in automotive sector – tyre and non-tyre rubber products. However, due to shift of energy sources from conventional to non-conventional, the rubber products sector depending on usage of fossil fuel may not grow at the same rate.

  1. Apart from serving the interests of Indian Rubber Industry, you have also been a successful business leader of a leading MNC business brand in conveyor belt industry. Since you started, what have been the major changes in your business ecosystem? And how have you repositioned yourself against the challenges to sustain your company’s leadership position in the conveyor belt industry?

My 18 years’ experience in conveyor belt industry (till Sept.’13) is a mixed one. The growth was achieved primarily in correctly understanding the intrinsic needs of the customers early. Once that was mapped, then we could mobilise all the available resources at a fast pace in meeting them. The manufacturing process was re-designed to make it customer centric. And finally improving the core competence of the team members through series of HR initiatives in order to continuously accept and win challenges. The company’s leadership position was achieved by networking with all the stakeholders as per the business need.

Know A Rubber Leader - T.K.Mukherjee

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  1. What kind of technological improvisations had you bought in to your business? Was this sufficient?

By being part of a MNC, we always had the opportunity to obtain continuous exposure of a world-class technology, whereby the customers always found the winning products from the company. Be it application issues or environmental issues or capex issues – we could always provide a workable solution. We always believed that improvement was a continuous process; hence the question of ‘sufficiency’ did not arise.

  1. Today you also consult clients in rubber industry. Is the machinery industry in India currently meeting your client’s technology requirement? Do they import machinery? If yes, how do you feel this gap in technology be bridged over next 5 years?

The Indian Rubber Machine manufacturing industry need to grow in terms of scale, cost competitiveness and quality. Chinese machines with comparable quality are still cheaper. The ultimate customers have more reliance on American/European/Japanese machines, equipment and process, though these are expensive. We definitely need to bridge this gap. Perhaps many companies are trying to manufacture all the major machines as a package deal. Instead of that, we need to focus on mixing, calendaring/extruding, curing press etc. Technology tie-up/equity partnership with American/Japanese companies may help Indian companies to achieve world class standard during the next 5 years’ time. In this direction the ‘Make in India’ initiative, Mumbai-Delhi Economic corridor could provide an excellent opportunity.

  1. I know you have traveled widely and visited many rubber goods manufacturing plants. What is the level of awareness about developments in Rubber Machinery and production technology today in India? Is it different globally?

Now a days the Indian entrepreneurs are travelling outside India quite a bit. They have a fair amount of knowledge of what is globally available. But they are not equally informative of what is possible within the country. It could be a good idea that Indian Rubber Machinery companies may jointly undertake to showcase to Indian entrepreneurs their capabilities by organizing pan India roadshows. This would also help them to understand their customers need.

  1. Rubber sector in India has grown to over 6000 units and is today a highly labour and energy intensive sector. Employing over half a million skilled manpower and many unskilled, what difference do you see the National Rubber Policy making to the stakeholders including the rubber machinery sector?

National Policy on Rubber (NPoR) is an excellent initiative in addressing various issues of the stakeholders- though sometimes these are diametrically opposite. Definitely issues related to Rubber Machinery industry must also be highlighted as they are also a stakeholder.

Handling skill level of a labor intensive industry like Rubber is a challenge. However, under the NSDC umbrella we are quite active in sectoral skill development initiatives under RSDC. This would help sustaining the growth momentum as mentioned earlier.

  1. Currently, you play a very key role as a strategic mentor to CEO’s and also involved in financial sector. SME’s today starve due to lack of “timely” funds and this has been the case in the past too. No change. Is this situation improving? Is there something that SME entrepreneurs can proactively work on to attract funding?

I agree that finding fund for growth of SME sector continues to be a problem. Banks have their issues like – mounting NPAs, high cost of operation etc. Similarly SME sector has their own problem of organizing collaterals and proportionate equity contribution. Various schemes of govt. are also not known sufficiently to the entrepreneurs. In this regard Industry associations may take a leading role in facilitating the process. The financial conditions of many state governments are weak and uncertain- as a result they are able to meet their own commitments. Actually a sustained work is necessary during the next 5 years in order to improve the lot.

The Indian rubber industry is dominated by SME sector, hence such improvements can only ensure growth of this sector.

  1. Great! And one last question, what would be your advice on machinery to your clients and entrepreneurial business leaders in rubber industry?

The Indian entrepreneurs must accept that only by adopting a higher degree of mechanization they would be able to improve the quality and reduce cost. However, they are somewhat uncertain about the skill level of their own people- Blue and white collar. There has to be an engagement program involving all the work force. There has to be a low cost mechanization program. If one looks at some of the successful SME rubber companies, this point would be well established

xxxxxxx

Download the full PDF of this interview here

Let me know your thoughts.


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Skills Required For An Rubber Extruder Operator: What No One Is Talking About

To a layman and HR Department of most organizations, an extruder operator is a person who operates and maintains this rubber machinery. Period!

Is that it?

Operator

An Image From Web

Depending upon your final product, rubber extrusion could be either a very important or the most critical manufacturing aspect of your operations. Thus the skills required for your extruder operator are paramount.

Extruded rubber products differ from those produced through moulding. In extrusion, parts are forced through a die of the required cross section under pressure of an rubber extruder. The extrusion process begins when you feed the unvulcanized rubber compound into the extruder. The rubber travels over the flutes of the revolving screw into the die, with the pressure and temperature increasing as the compound gets closer to the die. And when it reaches the die, the built up pressure forces the material through the die-opening, where it will consequently swell in various degrees based on your compound and hardness.

Most extruded products are unvulcanized before extrusion. This leaves the the rubber in a soft and pliable state post-extrusion. Hence they need to be vulcanized before they are they are rendered usable. During the vulcanization, the extruded rubber will swell or shrink in both its cross section and its length (again based on the type of rubber compound used).

Hence, the cost of errors or omissions could turn out to be very high when extruding rubber. You need a skilled operator.

Rubicon-Halle Extruder

Image of Rubicon-Halle Extruder

Here are the skills required for an rubber extruder operator.

Monitoring and Control Of Operations – The most important skill of your extruder operator should be to have a keen eye for watching gauges, dials, or other indicators in the control panel to make sure the extruder is working properly. Your extruder operator should be able to adjust screw speed, set water flow to the required rate, operate temperature control unit (TCU) or the metal detector in cold feed extruders, observe the extrusion parameters and ensure adherence to SOP (temperature or die swell). He has to ensure that the extruder, dies and its allied downstream equipment are kept clean, safety features are functional, and all accessories are ready.

Quality Control Analysis – Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance is a desirable basic skill that your operator should have. This could be as critical as preventing wastage (from scorch of your rubber extrudate) to as trivial as sending the sample to lab for testing.

Critical Thinking, Judgement and Decision Making – Operating a rubber extruder requires critical thinking skills because your operator should use logic and reasoning to identify alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems he faces while extruder is in operation. There could be many problems while extruding rubber like die-swell, melt fracture, or poor appearance amongst others. While all of them may not be extrusion related, your operator should be able to judge the gravity of the error and also decide what to do about it – whether to fine tune the extruder operating parameters, or escalate to supervisor or raise a service visit request of the manufacturer’s engineer.

Troubleshooting, Repairing & Maintenance – Your operator is the first point of contact with your extruder in operation. Hence, he should have the experience or knowledge on extruders to determine the causes of any operating errors when they occur. Performing routine maintenance and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed is an important skill that your operator should posses. He should be able to use the required tools to both repair and assist repair of your extruders when needed in the most urgent manner.

Complex Problem Solving – As a addendum to the above skill, your operator should develop skills to identify and solve complex problems when they occur at site and support maintenance department effectively over a period of time. This will reduce the downtime of your extruder and ensure maximum availability at site.

Speaking – Your operator should be able to talk to you (or his supervisor) to convey information effectively be it to report data/problems/incidents as applicable in a timely manner.

Reading Comprehension – Extruders have an operating and maintenance manual supplied by the manufacturer. This is a crucial document that requires a reading by your operator for his safety, training as well as equipment safety. Again your extrusion process would have specific work related instructions or SOP. Your operator should be able to understand written sentences and paragraphs in these documents. Hence, reading skills is very important for a successful operator. It is not necessary (while it is preferred) that they read English, because you could translate these documents to your operator’s local language for ease of reading.

Active Learning – Your operator should display active learning skills.  This is because, the sophistication of the rubber extrusion machinery has risen over the years. Automation and new controls might get introduced or new parameters of extrusion could be introduced further too –  all of which he might have to learn or get trained in.

Summarizing, your rubber extruder operator needs high level of skills to give you maximum output. Hence, its wise that either you hire a skilled operator or train your operator to upgrade his skills. Your extruder operator must stay up-to-date on current and developing technologies and techniques. He must also have a solid understanding of safety techniques and practices.


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Update Of A Recent Refresher Training Program at Kuala Lumpur

Hi! This post is different from my regular notes on rubber machinery.

This is a short and quick update about a recently completed refresher training for rubber professionals at Kuala Lumpur (May 5-6, 2015).

I had the privilege of delivering this training along with Mehul Patel – renowned rubber compounding and reclaim expert. Mehul (MD of Attuned Polymers Pvt. Ltd) is a veteran rubber industry consultant, ISO TC 45 Project Leader, Chairman of IRI-Mumbai Branch, and has presented over 36 technical papers worldwide

Training in Malaysia For Rubber Professionals

Over 25 professionals from MRB (Malaysian Rubber Board or Lembaga Getah Malaysia (LGM)) and Rubber sector attended this refresher training. Session topics were Reclaim Rubber, Compounding & Mixing, and Adhesives.

I covered Machinery. Compounding and Mixing Machinery presentations had key technical and visual inputs from Bainite Machines. The second half of this session aptly titled “Adopting Solutions That Makes A Rubber Mixing Plant…Truly Integrated” had comprehensive inputs from rubber machinery automation solution experts, Base Automation.

All the training contents were well received. Some of the sessions had a healthy exchange of ideas, questions and clarifications. The presence of an amazing pool of young talent among the august audience made this program a memorable one for us.

The training was well-organized by Ikatan Tekun Sdn Bhd (ITSB) at the lush green campus of MRB Advanced Processing and Product Technology, R&D Centre of Excellence (COE).

ITSB, based out of Kuala Lumpur, caters to the requirements of Rubber Industry in Malaysia. Hassan Rahman (Managing Director of Ikatan Tekun) and Fezal Zakaria (Sales & Project Manager of Ikatan Tekun) – the dynamic leaders behind this event – told me “We organized this refresher program to reiterate Ikatan Tekun’s strong commitment to serve the Malaysian Rubber and Tire Industry.”  They launched their Technical Consulting Services with this program.

And I am informed, ITSB aspires to be the right partner for rubber processing machinery, technical consulting and customized training requirements of the Rubber Industry. So, if you are based out of Malaysia and seeking to buy any rubber machinery or access customized solutions, you may want to first check out the services of ITSB. Their young and dynamic team assures you prompt response and service to your requirements.

Buy Smart (Rubber) Machinery Products and Solutions, Malaysia!

Meanwhile when you plan a training program, please contact me to discuss how I can partner you on rubber machinery topics to offer you a high ROTI (Return On Training Investment).

 


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Top 15 Skills Required For An Internal Mixer (or Kneader) Operator

Rubber Mixing is a capital and energy intensive operation. And mixing machinery are the mother equipment. This could be an Internal Mixer (Banbury or Intermix) or Rubber Dispersion Kneader depending on the size of your organization and/or products manufactured.

Hence, the cost of errors or omissions are very high when compounding a batch in a mixer. You need a skilled operator. Ever pondered on the skills that make a mixer operator successful?

Internal Mixer Operator

Here is the list of top 15 skills for an successful batch mixer (or kneader) operator. (Updated on 23rd Dec 2015: Flip through this post in our digital edition and download here)

  1. Control of Operations – Your mixer operator should be able to adjust ram pressure, control the mixing process, set parameters and ensure its completion as per SOP (temperature or time or energy as programmed/specified).
  2. Monitoring Operations – The most important skill of your operator should be to have a keen eye for watching gauges, dials, or other indicators in the control panel or HMI to make sure the mixer is working properly. He has to ensure that the mixer is kept clean, safety features are functional,  upstream and downstream equipment along with all accessories (like cooling water, hydraulic/pneumatic system, temperature control unit (TCU), lubrication system, etc) are ready
  3. Active Listening – Your operator should be a skilled listener. He should actively listen to the sounds of the mixer and its motor during a mixing cycle; pay full attention to what his supervisor (or you) or his colleagues on the mixing room safety are saying, take time to understand the points being made, and ask relevant questions.
  4. Speaking – Your operator should be able to talk to you (or his supervisor) to convey information effectively be it to report data/problems/incidents as applicable in a timely manner
  5. Reading Comprehension – An operating and maintenance manual is normally supplied together with the rubber mixer. This is a crucial document. Again your compounding process may involve specific work related instructions or SOP. Or there could be a training manual in some instances. Your operator should be able to understand written sentences and paragraphs in these documents. Hence, reading skills is very important for a successful operator. It is not necessary (while it is preferred) that they read English, because you could translate these documents to your operator’s local language for ease of reading.
  6. Troubleshooting, Judgment and Decision Making – Your operator is the first point of contact with your mixer in operation. Hence, he should have the experience or knowledge on mixers to determine/read the causes of any operating errors when they occur, judge the gravity of the error and also decide what to do about it – whether to reset the mixer, or escalate to supervisor or raise a service visit request of the manufacturer’s engineer.
  7. Critical Thinking – Operating a rubber mixer requires critical thinking skills because your operator should use logic and reasoning to identify alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems he faces while mixer is in operation.
  8. Quality Control Analysis – Your operator should have basic skills on quality control with an outlook to meet your set mix quality parameters in every batch. This may involve need for appropriate fine tuning like helping you fix the batch weight, or sending the sample of specified compound/ batch in specified form to lab for testing.
  9. Social Perceptiveness – Emotions could run high in the rubber mixing room. Your operator should display “awareness” of others’ reactions and understanding of why they react as they do in a particular circumstance.
  10. Repairing – Your mixer operator should be able to use the required tools to both repair and assist repair of mixers when needed in the most urgent manner.
  11. Time Management – Your operator should manage his own time and display sensitivity to the time of other co-workers involved in the mixing room.
  12. Mixer Maintenance – Performing routine maintenance on mixer and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed is an important skill that your operator should posses.
  13. Active Learning – Your operator should display active learning skills. This is because, mixers get upgraded, automation and new controls might get introduced or new methods of mixing could be introduced all of which he might have to learn or get trained in.
  14. Writing – If you could get an operator who could communicate effectively in writing to you (or his supervisor) or to other departments, then I would say you have a great asset.
  15. Complex Problem Solving – Your operator should develop skills to identify and solve complex problems when they occur at site and support maintenance department effectively over a period of time. This reduces the downtime of your mixer.

Do you agree the above listed 15 skills, required for an Internal Mixer or Kneader Operator, are comprehensive? Let us know.


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