Rubber & Tyre Machinery World

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The Collectors Edition Of Most-Read Topics in 2015

The year 2015 has been an exciting one for RUBBER MACHINERY WORLD. This portal now brings to you increasing range of topics on rubber and tyre machinery regularly.

A passion that started out on Valentine’s Day to share information on machinery is now a well regarded Knowledge Portal on Rubber & Tyre Equipment closing in on 40k hits with a fast growing reader base of equipment buyers across 5 continents.

As 2015 draws to a close, reflecting on your progress is a sure way to move ahead. Because, though you cannot change your past, by learning from the ‘misses’ and building confidence from your ‘hits’, you can ‘plan’ for greater success in 2016.

Till date this year, we received amazing feedback on the differentiated style of presenting valuable knowledge concisely in a refreshing, simple and easy-to-access manner. Few topics really stood out for the reader’s interest and its recurring need.

In this concluding issue of 2015, we chose to reciprocate your appreciation and feedback in the most apt manner. So, we compiled the 3 most-read topics on our portal into a single ‘collector’s edition’ for your quick reference always.

Here’s the collectors edition of 3 Most-Read Topics in 2015

Collectors-Edition-Best-of-2015

Click on the cover image above to flip through or download PDF

I hope this collector’s edition of Rubber & Tyre Machinery World’s e-Publications finds space in your digital library – either as your favorite bookmarks or valuable PDF downloads.

I wish you Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas and A Prosperous New Year. May all your dreams turn into reality and all your efforts into great achievements in 2016.

Please continue to encourage, help us improve with your feedback and comments in 2016 as well.

(Disclaimer: Any pictures and quoted statements in our special supplements are shared with us by the respective companies and/or sources are mentioned appropriately. Rubber Machinery World does not independently verify them nor will vouch for their actions, hence will not be liable for any misrepresented data.)


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If you are an equipment supplier and would like your organization to be promoted on Rubber Machinery World, please see the opportunities on Partner Me or Contact Me at rubbermachineryworld@gmail.com for your customized offering.


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The Future Will See A Lot of Machinery Makers – David Shaw

The future will see a lot of machinery makers; some will be based in Asia; some in Europe and some in the Americas. It will become a lot more difficult to guess which offer high tech and high prices or low tech and low prices simply by looking at their country of origin, says David Shaw, CEO of Tire Industry Research, in an exclusive interview with Rubber Machinery World.

David Shaw, is a tall leader and a global expert on the international tire and rubber industry. He has studied tire manufacturing, raw materials, processes and technologies and how they vary around the world. This deep technical knowledge, built up over 25 years combined with a thorough understanding of branding, pricing and distribution channels, gives him a unique advantage to analyse regional and global strategies in car, light truck, heavy truck & specialty tires.

With exceptional knowledge, clarity, relevance and insight, David offer both overviews and detailed analyses of companies, markets, sectors, segments and regions as a strategy consultant.

Interview With David Shaw

Click on the image to Flip through digital edition

I consider it a privilege to know him and present his thoughts to you in our “Know A Leader” Series. Because, it is a lengthy interview covering a wide topic on trends, growth drivers, innovation, sustainability, tire design, machinery improvements, concerns, role of China & India, etc; I reproduce below only 3 Q&A’s to give you a feel.

I invite you to read the complete interview online on our digital edition (by clicking on the image above).

Q3) One school of thought that has been endorsed by another expert is that there have been very few changes in tyre industry in the last 100 years. Your views?

David Shaw: I saw your interview with Jacob Peled. I like Jacob very much. He has been a good friend and teacher to me and has been in the business longer than I have, so I have great respect for his views.

He is right to say that there has been limited progress in the fundamental design of much equipment in the tyre and rubber industry, but I think his analysis can be expanded. We have seen huge improvements in the detailed design. Productivity, repeatability and process-flexibility have all improved tremendously in the last couple of decades, albeit in a series of incremental improvements.

The introduction of consumer labelling for tyres a few years ago in Japan, Korea and the EU led to a near-revolution in the tyre manufacturing side in which machinery makers were asked to deliver equipment that can make semi-finished components and finished tyres with tight Cpk and Cpp values.

Tyre building has changed massively – not only with the introduction of radial designs in the 1940s, but over the last couple of decades the need for more automation and faster size changes has led to a transformation in the design of TBM equipment and especially building drums.

Although mixers still use the same principles as original designs of Thomas Hancock, the power of the rotors, the heat transfer capacity and the variety of rotor designs for high shear, intensive mixing and other processes show tremendous creativity and development.

It so happens that I believe the internal mixer is close to the end of its development cycle. I think that in the near future we will see some very significant developments in mixing technology which can overcome some of the limitations of internal mixers when it comes to high-volume, highly dispersive mixing of silica in solution SBR and high molecular-weight Nd-BR compounds.

Q6) What new ideas are energizing the tyre industry globally? How much of it is related to machinery developments or improvements?

David Shaw:I have hinted above that I think the internal mixer is approaching the end of its product development cycle. Wear rates on tyres are closely linked to the uniformity of the compound on a 10nm – 100nm scale. That’s the size of agglomerations of carbon black and silica particles. More discontinuities in that size range lead to greater stress concentrations and consequently increased wear under dynamic loading as seen in hard cornering or heavy braking.

Current internal mixers are close to their limit when compounders want good dispersion on these scales, especially when mixing silica which likes to self-agglomerate.

I think we will see some very significant changes to the mixing process during 2016. If the industry adopts these new changes – and I am convinced that they will – then the design of compounds and the care of compounds will become a new field for machinery makers. I can envisage whole new classes of machinery which are less aggressive towards the compound. This in turn should lead to lower energy costs and improved product performance.

Second, the machinery suppliers have traditionally looked only at initial capital investments by tyre makers with on-going maintenance contracts where they can sell them. They have restricted themselves to the machinery.

I suspect that one or two of them will venture into the raw materials supply area. Already we have seen Mesnac investigating some material properties. Today this is largely driven by a need to better understand how these materials can be processed.

I remember a conversation with Ronil Malaney in India a few years ago. At the time he was acting as agent for machinery makers and for materials suppliers. There are strong synergies in that combination.

As machinery supplier, you get an idea of the capacity of the factory and so can predict what materials will be needed and in what volumes. As materials supplier, you can get an idea of when a factory is close to capacity and might want to think about expanding, so can time your upgrade suggestions accordingly.

Q10) What would be your advice on machinery to both equipment buyers and equipment sellers?

David Shaw: To both buyers and sellers, I’d say the future will see a lot of machinery makers; some will be based in Asia; some in Europe and some in the Americas. It will become a lot more difficult to guess which offer high tech and high prices or low tech and low prices simply by looking at their country of origin.

My advice to sellers would be to explore every way of removing cost without removing value and to develop a deep understanding of the attributes your customer thinks genuinely add value; concentrate on those aspects to exceed the expectations of your customer.

To buyers, I’d say look at the total cost of ownership, but also think about the kind of tyres you want to make and assess the performance needed for each operation within that envelope. In many cases, balancing initial cost against overall quality can bring the amortisation time down, so reducing the overall financial risk.

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Download PDF Here

I look forward to hear your thoughts on David Shaw’s interview.


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Dispersion Kneader – Your Friend in ‘Knead’

For many years, open mill mixing has been the preferred form of mixing rubber. But then technology has been evolving.

Thus came mixers and the major considerations had always been cost. Since last twenty-five years, the Kneaders have become the most commonly used type of ‘mixer‘ in the rubber industry.

Kneader-Special-Supplement

Click on the Image to Flip Through The Digital Book

Download PDF of this digital edition.

This popularity, prompted us to showcase Dispersion Kneaders specifically in this Knowledge On-The-Go Special Supplement. Though developed initially for mixing thermoplastics, Dispersion Kneaders have a unique place in the elastomer mixing industry. Users love the ease of cleanliness on this machine especially when they have to change the color of their compounds frequently.

Dispersion Kneader is energy-efficient, maintenance-friendly, labor and time-saving machinery that offers consistent quality of rubber mix compound at higher output as compared to an open mixing mill – thus making it truly Your Friend in ‘Knead’ for your rubber processing plant.

I hope you agree and find this special supplement informative.

(Disclaimer: Any pictures and quoted statements in our special supplements including Know Your Supplier editions are shared with us by the respective companies and/or sources are mentioned appropriately. Rubber Machinery World does not independently verify them nor will vouch for their actions, hence will not be liable for any misrepresented data)


If you liked this article, please do share with your colleagues, customers and friends. And If you would like to be informed of our articles regularly, please register with us for free updates today.

If you are an equipment supplier and would like your organization to be promoted on Rubber Machinery World, please see the opportunities on Partner Me or Contact Me at rubbermachineryworld@gmail.com for your customized offering.


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The Biggest Problem with Heat Transfer Efficiency in Rubber Machinery (And How You Can Fix It)

Rubber processing has a bizarre energy pattern, when seen from a layman’s perspective. Because you add heat into your process and then you cool down!

Heat addition and removal is repeated in each of your subsequent stages as well.

When you process rubber, energy is consumed across the value chain – right from transport of raw rubber, to the various processing operations (be it rubber mixing, rubber extrusion, rubber calendering, moulding etc) to convert into your suitable product and then transportation of your product.

Energy Uses in Rubber Processing

Source: Tangram

This implies that you need to cool down your rubber processing machinery regularly, which simultaneously involves heat exchange from a hot medium to a cooler medium.

And the most common medium to cool is water.

But where there’s water, you will face water-related problems caused by its mineral deposits. These deposits could give you varying degrees of water-related problems that affect your operating efficiencies and/or even leading to more costly equipment downtime issues.

This could be in your Rubber Machinery like Mixer, Mixing Mill Rolls, Calender Rolls, Press, Extruder, Heat Exchangers, Moulds, and factory equipment like Boilers, Chillers, Compressors, and TCU‘s or other Ancillary Units, etc.

You would notice that the mineral deposits accumulate quickly regardless of screens or treatment actions adopted. Even a thin coating of water scale will act to insulate the water system’s surface and retard the transfer of heat.

Hence, scaling is the biggest problem affecting the heat transfer efficiency in rubber machinery.

To increase heat transfer efficiency, lower maintenance cost, conserve overall energy consumption and thus enhance the usable life of your machinery, removing scales in all your water-cooled or water-heated rubber and tyre equipment is very important.

In a simple rubber machinery like the mixing mill, the presence of scales on rolls leads to localized hot spots affecting your mixing quality. In the case of boilers, scales can be very damaging leading to even boiler rupture. When water scale, lime and rust deposits accumulate on the water side of chambers, rotors and the drop door of the Mixer, it causes temperature of your rubber stock to rise and gradually lead to a loss in production.

Different machinery has different safe and effective method to remove scales. Recently, I was shown an instruction sheet, from one of the descalers (RYDLYME), on the process to descale a rubber mixer that I found interesting.

Here’s the process reproduced. I hope you too find it informative.

How To Clean Your Rubber Mixer

Image From RYDLYME

  1. Take mixer out of service.
  2. Close water supply valve at header as shown in the sketch above.
  3. Drain all water from all sections of mixer.
  4. Connect Descaling Solution pump discharge hose to water header. Header usually supplies all circuits.
  5. Connect return hoses to drain lines from all circuits and place into the Descaling Solution receiver.
  6. Close water supply valves to gate and jacket circuits.
  7. Start pump and pump the descaling solution into rotors to purge the water from this circuit to sewer. When the descaling solution begins to discharge from this hose, return to the receiver.
  8. Open water supply valve to gate and maintain Descaling Solution circulation through this circuit.
  9. Open water supply valve to jacket and maintain Descaling Solution circulation through this circuit.
  10. If any circuit is NOT flowing properly, restrict Descaling Solution flow in other circuits until flow returns to normal in this circuit.
  11. Circulate a total of 120 Litres of Descaling Solution through all circuits of mixer until clean. This will require approximately four (4) hours pumping time.
  12. It is suggested to periodically rotate the rotors during Descaling Solution cleaning to assure that the Descaling Solution is in contact with all of the lobes of the rotor.
  13. Upon completion of cleaning, flush all Descaling Solution from all circuits with fresh water.
  14. Disconnect the Descaling Solution pump and all hoses. The mixer is now ready to be returned to service.
  15. Periodic descaling will keep the temperatures of the mixer within acceptable limits, assuring you a better product and minimize burnt or improperly mixed stock.
  16. Clean out the Descaling Solution System and store for future use.

Summarizing, scaling is the biggest problem with heat transfer efficiency in your rubber machinery. Descaling or cleaning the scales helps you fix this issue. Hence incorporating descaling solutions into your preventive maintenance program is recommended to keep your equipment running effectively and economically.

Do you agree?


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Mixing Mill – A Story Of Woes to Wows

Two-Roll Mixing Mills have been in existence since the time mixing of rubber started for various applications. It is still a sacred machinery for the rubber processors. Hence, we had to think thrice or even more before we decided to write a feature on this machinery in our digital publications.

The theme ‘Mixing Mill: A Story of Woes To Wows!!’, I think, is a true reflection of what this popular rubber machinery has morphed into. Modern mixing mills are rich in features, safe and automated as compared to ancestors. (I think you will agree that our edition’s cover page sums up this contrast well!).

Please click on the below image to go to the digital edition of this special supplement.

Download PDF here

Our previous issue of a concise Knowledge On-The-Go Special Supplement to give you useful information in a concise and timely manner was a success with some exciting reviews. Thanks to each one of you – our readers and advertisers.

I hope you will find this edition too informative and interesting. Please do let me know.

(Disclaimer: The pictures and statements in our special supplements including Know Your Supplier editions are shared with us by the respective companies and/or sources are mentioned appropriately. Rubber Machinery World does not independently verify them nor will vouch for their genuineness that they share with us, hence will not be liable for any misrepresented data)


If you liked this article, please do share with your colleagues, customers and friends. And If you would like to be informed of our articles regularly, please register with us for free updates today.

If you are an equipment supplier and would like your organization to be promoted on Rubber Machinery World, please see the opportunities on Partner Me or Contact Me at rubbermachineryworld@gmail.com for your customized offering.


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Machinery Is The Key To Rubber Processing – Dr. Chakravarty

Machinery is the key to rubber processing and brought significant changes in rubber industry, says Dr. S.N.Chakravarty in an exclusive interview with Rubber Machinery World. Celebrating his 50th year in Rubber Industry working in different countries including India, he shares his experience.

Know A Rubber Leader

Dr. Chakravarty has many achievements to his credit. After working in Bayer AG, Germany for many years he became Technical Manager of Bayer (India) Ltd. and then of Modi Rubber Ltd. Subsequently he started his own Consultancy Organisation in Rubber and related field.

He is the past Chairman of Indian Rubber Institute and Rubber Committee (PCD14) of Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS), Fellow of Plastics & Rubber Institute, PRI (UK), Indian Rubber Institute (IRI),  Indian Chemical Society (ICS), Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers (IIChE), Inst. of Chemist and Member of Rubber Division, American Chemical Society (USA). He represented India in TC 45 / ISO & was a member of IRCO, UK Committee, Convenor of 1st Int. Rubber Conf., Rubber Con ’93 Delhi in 1993 and member of ITTAC for many years.

Dr. Chakravarty has been Hon. Professor of Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi and Kharagpur, visiting Faculty to different Universities & Institutes. He was the first President of Asian Rubber Forum to which all Asian countries like Japan, Korea, China, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Nepal etc. are members.

Dr Chakravarty has more than 106 Publications in National & International journals of repute. His work in the area of Rubber Chemistry & Technology and educational activity are well recognised all over the country & abroad. Dr. Chakravarty has traveled widely over the world and has command over different languages.

Recently he was awarded the “TRiLA Life Time Achievement Award, 2015” by Tyre Times at the recently concluded Tyre expo in Chennai.

So, now you would understand my predicament when I had to limit to 10 questions to capture his vast knowledge, leadership and expertise to feature him in your Know Your Rubber Leader Series!

Fortunately (for me), he also shares his expertise through articles on this portal. (Read his earlier posts – Mixing & Mix Design and Injection Moulding Of Rubber Product)

Below are some thoughtful snippets of his interview while you could read the complete interview by clicking on the image below.

Know A Rubber Leader - Dr.Chakravarty

Click on this image to read the complete interview

  1. Would you say that rubber processing has undergone change in the last 4.5 decades that you have been with rubber industry? What were the drivers for this change?

Surely, rubber processing has undergone substantial changes over the last about 5 decades, This is mainly due to availability of developed machinery – Mixer, Extruder, Calender, Presses etc., along with electronic / microprocessor controls, as well as development of rubber technology & ingredients used in compounding. Machinery is the key to rubber processing.

  1. What role has machinery played in this change?

Machinery played many fold role in rubber industry. These developments of machinery have made it possible to

  • Improve production output (impact on cost)
  • Superior dispersion & homogeneity – improvement in property level.
  • Lowering of wastage – impact on cost
  • Dimensional accuracy of components
  • Accuracy in working – improvement in quality
  • Effective Quality Control (QC)
  • Energy saving – very important factor
  • Pollution Control, better housekeeping, health factor for the working people in this industry.

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Read Complete Interview or Download PDF Here

I hope you find this interview insightful. Let me know your thoughts.


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Tire Production Simplified In A Flow Chart

My earlier post on Tyre Building Machine – 5 Amazing Videos You Must See was well received by the readers and they found it informative.

I have in earlier posts covered rubber machinery like Bale Cutter, Mixer, Mixing Mill, Batch-Off, Extruder, Tire Buffer, etc. However, its intriguing to see where all these equipment (along with the other machinery) goes into tire production.

This flow chart simplifies tire production overview and helps you visualize the various equipment that we discuss on this portal Rubber Machinery World in the right perspective.

Tire-Production-Flow-Chart

The source of above flow chart is from Nell Achieve Website.

And just in case, you thought even for a microsecond ‘Is this all to tyre manufacturing?’, I correct you here.

The tire production process is a very meticulous and complex  affair. Click here to download the infographic from Giti that explains their tire production concisely.

I hope you found this post informative. Let me know.


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