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A Beginner’s Guide to Rubber Refiner Mill

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Are you looking for a rubber refiner mill? Great. Now you try searching this key word in google or any other search engine and explore a few sites.

How many direct search results did you get without linkages to rubber mixing mills or two-roll mills? Even more importantly, how many sites gave you clarity of information you sought for on this category of rubber machinery? Less than 2-3, on the brightest side, if I may say so.

And this is why I am prompted to write a beginner’s guide to rubber refiner mill.

First things first. You need a rubber refiner mill mainly for the refining of reclaimed rubber. The operational ease and functional performance makes this mill your preferred machinery in reclaim rubber industry for refining pure and fine rubber powder from waste.

Refiner Rubber Mill

A Rebuilt Refiner Mill From Deguma

Similar in construction to an open mixing mill, you will observe that its distinguishing feature is that both the rolls have different diameter. The front roll is smaller in diameter as compared to the back roll. And hence when you see a refiner mill identified as 21″ x 24″ x 36″, you simply need to decode it as Front Roll diameter is 21 inches, Rear Roll diameter is 24 inches and both the rolls have same face length of 36 inches.

The Rear Rolls have a higher surface speed than the Front Rolls again a similar feature of a regular rubber mixing mill. However, in your refiner mill, the differential sized rolls turning at considerably different speeds provides a high friction ratio. The ratio of speed of your Front Roll to Rear Roll could vary in the range 1:1.75 to 1:2.50 depending on your process requirement.

When the rolls are set quite tightly to each other (i.e. close nip-gap adjustment of 0.05mm), refined rubber in thin-sheet form (~ 0.10mm) is produced. This sheet that you get is usually smooth, uniform and free of grain or lumps. In this refining process, the impurities contained in reclaimed rubber are squeezed by rolls to the both sides of rubber sheet which can be removed. Therefore, the purity of your reclaimed rubber is increased in refiner mills.

In the past, this finished rubber sheet was pulled towards a wind-up attachment and layered few times to increase the thickness of the sheet (approx. 25mm), post which they are cut using a hand knife by your operator (video from YouTube). The cut sheet are then dusted and stacked. Today some reclaim rubber manufacturers rely on balers to package the rubber sheets.

These sheets are stored and sold for a wide variety of end products like new tires (especially carcass, side-wall, under-tread of passenger, light-truck and off-road tires; inner liner of tubeless passenger tires; semi-pneumatic tires), tubes, automotive floor mats, de-vulcanisation for low technology pressed or extruded rubber goods, tread rubbers, adhesives, sealing and tape compounds, belting, battery containers, molded products, and rubberized asphalt.

Summarizing, though Rubber Refiner Mill is similar in appearance, construction and features of safety and operation; as a beginner, you simply need to absorb that these are special types of two-roll mill used in reclaim rubber industry to produce smooth and homogeneous rubber sheets.

Would you like to add more thoughts?


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Author: Prasanth Warrier

Co-Founder | #B2B Strategy, Marketing & BD Consultant | Speaker | Trainer | Enjoys Traveling, Reading & Meeting People | #SocialSelling | #Blogger | Knowledge Sharing | Blessed with Loving Family & Friends | Voracious Reader | Business Leader serving Rubber Industry

One thought on “A Beginner’s Guide to Rubber Refiner Mill

  1. We are initially looking for a budget price for a rebuilt refiner mill

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